The future of public education in America is tied to vouchers. The question is whether that's a positive move or just another hollow promise. The purpose of VoucherSchool.com is to educate and inform. The writing on this site is assuming the ultimate goal of those in favor of a "full voucher" system is to provide one voucher per student to be used however the parents of that child want to use it, thus making it full school choice, as well. A system like this has merits and challenges, winners and losers.

Plenty of people will tell you what they want you to believe, using data to back up their assertions. Keep in mind that data is often skewed and is certainly only used when it benefits those doing the writing. With that in mind, we want to develop a website with as many questions as answers, since those who want vouchers and those who want to fight them should be the ones who have answers for you 

 

After viewing hundreds of Wisconsin school district pages, one fact is apparent: school districts are trying to operate with their heads in the sand, avoiding the inevitable. Websites look disorganized and unprofessional, as if the districts are in the process of throwing every idea at the problem, not knowing which one will work. They're forgetting the key to winning a battle for their existence, which is positive public opinion. With websites designed by Passive Ninja, they might have a chance, but with half-developed sites mostly linking to outsourced material, districts are waving the white flag.

The number of businesses already benefiting from outsourcing education is high, but it will likely only rise. As districts lose clout, funding, and effectiveness, private entities will benefit. Educabana is an example of one of these companies, poised to capture opportunities to fill gaps in an underfunded school system. Teachers and students will have a chance to excel, but it might be up to the individual to figure it all out in the future.

As a teacher, as a parent, or as a student, the age of the voucher school is an age of change. If you're not ready, you either must prepare for the change or fight against it. Voucher School is here to give you an idea what might be changing and what you might be able to do about it.

Jacksonville News

New Jax Witty

Articles, reviews, advice, and legitimate research to go along with some back-handed comments. Think of us as Jacksonville's mother-in-law.
  • Jax Local Ad of the Week: Pro Glass
    Remember to support local businesses. Now to the ad.

    Pro Glass is advertising frameless shower doors, but the door itself, along with the rest of this bathroom scene, seem just a little bit off. At first glance, it's a beautiful master bath, but the fun (and the devil) is in the details. Let's take a closer look at that room.
    The glass door looks great. But something seemed weird about it swinging in to me. When I looked it up, building code generally says that shower doors CAN swing in but MUST swing out. That's why I've never seen one swung in, and you probably haven't, either. My assumption is that this door swings in AND out, and maybe people tend to like the look of it swung into the shower area. The reason for the code is that a door that only swings in would trap someone in the shower if he or she falls, which is why this one must swing both ways (insert pop icon joke here). So I get that, but why is it swung in or out in the photo? Would anyone leave the shower like this? My wife certainly wouldn't let me leave the shower door open after I was done. Just in case you want to duplicate this look without hiring pros like Pro Glass, be sure to avoid installing a shower door backwards in order to save space.

    The bathtub seems to be in the middle of the room, which is fine by me. I assume it makes plumbing a little more difficult, but that's a homeowner's choice. The little end table/stool next to the tub is a bit more questionable. It seems to be leather or some other soft material. On top of the table is a tray with bath oils or whatnot. Also, two towels. One towel is rolled up while the other is draped over the table. Why? I guess it looks fancy, but also, no towel racks. Is that a Florida thing? Because when I bought my house, it only had one towel rack in the shower and one over the tub, neither of which were convenient. I had to add more to the walls, where towel racks go. Or, you could add a door towel rack. But this bathroom has no towel racks at all. Just a window to allow sun-drying, but no rack in the shower or near the tub or on the door. I guess you're supposed to drape your wet towel over your beautiful shower enclosure, but that kind of defeats the purpose of all that beautiful glass.

    The last detail that is odd and maybe even a bit frightening is the bird. 
    The bird is standing in the way of a door that clearly opens in. Is it a doorstop? Maybe it's a towel rack. But when I searched online for bird doorstops and towel racks, I could not find this bad boy. I did notice that the bird stands out more than anything else in the room, so it must be important. But it's blocking EMTs from getting into the bathroom, just like a shower door that opens in. It also looks like it has sharp edges, like something I'd stick in the garden rather than where naked people walk around. If it's iron, it would probably rust as a towel rack. My wife says it's a crane. Do you want to have a crane, whether it's a towel rack, a doorstop, or a piece of art, staring at you in the shower or tub while blocking your only exit? No, thank you.



  • 1986 Bertone (Fiat) X 1/9 in Jacksonville

    I've been asked by a reader to add some photos of my X. I don't think she'd mind. 

    I've seen a few people snap photos of her as I drive around, but I've kind of neglected to take many of my own. Her permanent, legal home is in Wisconsin, where most of the photos were taken.